Archives For Exhibitions

Olafur Eliasson is part artist and part mad scientist. He is a very curious guy and manages to consistently makes incredible objects and environments. This video is about turning a massive hand made metallic sphere in the studio but the real magic begins after the job is done and the thing begins to spin….

His current exhibition sadly ( if you live in America ) is in Europe at the Langen Foundation in Germany.

Olafur Eliasson: Boros Collection 1994 – 2015 
On view until 18 October, 2015

via http://www.olafureliasson.net/

 

Olafur Eliasson: Sphere

Under Construction – New Positions in American Photography is a very interesting show of young photographers at the huge Pioneer Works Center for Art and Innovation. The exhibition originated at the Fotografiemuseum Amsterdam  better known across the pond as Foam. Looks like the the still life and constructed image is alive and well…

Group exhibition featuring works by Joshua Citarella, Jessica Eaton, Daniel Gordon, Matthew Leifheit & Cynthia Talmadge, Matt Lipps, Matthew Porter, Sara Cwynar, Kate Steciw and Sara VanDerBeek

ON VIEW: March 14 – April 26, 2015

 

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Via: http://pioneerworks.orgFotografiemuseum Amsterdam

 

Foam devoted an entire magazine to the show. You can see a preview here:  http://issuu.com/foam-magazine/docs/08-081_underconstruction_issuu_elis

 

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via Foam

 

Under Construction – New Positions in American Photography

March means it’s Month of Photography in Denver and my Animalis Images will be on view at Visions West Gallery along with Nine Francois.

 “Messengers and Promises is inspired by John Berger’s essay Why Look at Animals. In the last few centuries animals have been gradually disappearing from contemporary life. We live without them and mostly apart from nature. Animals first entered the human imagination as sacred, as messengers and promises. There was a spiritual quality to them. Our ancestors fueled their imaginations with animals and animals offered explanations to many things in the world. Today, animals and the natural world have a ghostly presence in most lives around the globe.”

 

exhibition

 

 

Exhibition: Messengers and Promises

 

*** I will be giving a presentation on my work Thursday, October 2, 6 p.m at the Museum.

Contemporary Photographers, Traditional Practices: Vision and Method in the 21st Century

October 2nd to November 22, 2014
Eleanor D. Wilson Museum at Hollins University

The Eleanor D. Wilson Museum at Hollins University enters its second decade this year with a fall exhibition celebrating photography. In collaboration with the Schmidt-Dean Gallery in Philadelphia, the museum presents an eclectic exhibition of thirteen contemporary photographers represented by the gallery, all of whom enjoy regional and national reputations. Curated by Schmidt-Dean Gallery director Christopher Schmidt, the exhibition features a wide range of both technical and conceptual approaches. Included are historical procedures such as the tintype, cyanotype and gum-bichromate process; alternative techniques such as pinhole and hand painting; and more traditional methods in both analog and digital. Throughout, these various approaches are applied to a wide range of subjects and ideas.

Exhibiting artists include: Linda Adlestein, ***Thomas Brummett, Susan Fenton, Larry Fink, Alida Fish, Sarah Van Keuren, Stuart Klipper, Christopher Moore, William Smith, Krista Steinke, Ruth Thorne Thomsen, Ida Weygandt, and Samuel Worthington.

 

 

Contemporary Photographers: Vision and Method in the 21st Century

One of 3 incredible shows now up at MOMA. A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio is a text book clinic on how to hang a wide ranging thematic exhibition. On any one wall you can scan decades of work zeroing in on a particular studio practices with ideas ranging from the photographic object to the  studio as stage or laboratory. This exhibition will teach you more about photography than just about any other I can think of in the last decade.

A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio February 8–October 5, 2014 @ MOMA

Francis Bruguière. Light Abstraction. c. 1925. Gelatin silver print, 9 15/16 x 7 15/16″ (25.2 x 20.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art,  New York. Gift of Arnold Newman © 1991 Kenneth H. Bruguière and Kathleen  Bruguière Anderson

Francis Bruguière. Light Abstraction. c. 1925. Gelatin silver print, 9 15/16 x 7 15/16″ (25.2 x 20.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art,
New York. Gift of Arnold Newman © 1991 Kenneth H. Bruguière and Kathleen
Bruguière Anderson

Screen shot 2014-08-04 at 12.24.18 PM     Screen shot 2014-08-04 at 12.37.57 PM

A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio examines the ways in which photographers and other artists using photography have worked and experimented within their studios, from photography’s inception to the present. Featuring both new acquisitions and works from the Museum’s collection that have not been on view in recent years, A World of Its Own brings together photographs, films, and videos by artists such as Berenice Abbott, Uta Barth, Zeke Berman, Karl Blossfeldt, Constantin Brancusi, Geta Brătescu, Harry Callahan, Robert Frank, Jan Groover, Barbara Kasten, Man Ray, Bruce Nauman, Paul Outerbridge, Irving Penn, Adrian Piper, Edward Steichen, William Wegman, and Edward Weston.

Depending on the period, the cultural or political context, and the commercial, artistic, or scientific motivations of the artist, the studio might be a haven, a stage, a laboratory, or a playground. For more than a century, photographers have dealt with the spaces of their studios in strikingly diverse and inventive ways: from using composed theatrical tableaux (in photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron or Cindy Sherman) to putting their subjects against neutral backdrops (Richard Avedon, Robert Mapplethorpe); from the construction of architectural sets within the studio (Francis Bruguière, Thomas Demand) to chemical procedures conducted within the darkroom (Walead Beshty, Christian Marclay); and from precise recordings of motion (Eadweard Muybridge, Harold Edgerton) to playful, amateurish experimentation (Roman Signer, Peter Fischli and David Weiss). A World of Its Own offers another history of photography—a photography created within the walls of the studio, and yet as innovative as its more extroverted counterpart, street photography. via MoMA