As Arcade Fire’s Reflector Tour comes to a close at the end of August in Montreal lets take a moment to remember just how good they have been in concert.  This is probably everyone’s favorite version of Ready to Start (that you can not purchase) and could be just one of those songs that defines what rock should always strive to be

A lesson on how to make a live video if there ever was one, the video was released on August 20, 2010, directed by Charlie Lightening and filmed at the band’s July 7, 2010 concert at the Hackney Empire in London.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arcade Fire Ready To Start

One of 3 incredible shows now up at MOMA. A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio is a text book clinic on how to hang a wide ranging thematic exhibition. On any one wall you can scan decades of work zeroing in on a particular studio practices with ideas ranging from the photographic object to the  studio as stage or laboratory. This exhibition will teach you more about photography than just about any other I can think of in the last decade.

A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio February 8–October 5, 2014 @ MOMA

Francis Bruguière. Light Abstraction. c. 1925. Gelatin silver print, 9 15/16 x 7 15/16″ (25.2 x 20.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art,  New York. Gift of Arnold Newman © 1991 Kenneth H. Bruguière and Kathleen  Bruguière Anderson

Francis Bruguière. Light Abstraction. c. 1925. Gelatin silver print, 9 15/16 x 7 15/16″ (25.2 x 20.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art,
New York. Gift of Arnold Newman © 1991 Kenneth H. Bruguière and Kathleen
Bruguière Anderson

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A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio examines the ways in which photographers and other artists using photography have worked and experimented within their studios, from photography’s inception to the present. Featuring both new acquisitions and works from the Museum’s collection that have not been on view in recent years, A World of Its Own brings together photographs, films, and videos by artists such as Berenice Abbott, Uta Barth, Zeke Berman, Karl Blossfeldt, Constantin Brancusi, Geta Brătescu, Harry Callahan, Robert Frank, Jan Groover, Barbara Kasten, Man Ray, Bruce Nauman, Paul Outerbridge, Irving Penn, Adrian Piper, Edward Steichen, William Wegman, and Edward Weston.

Depending on the period, the cultural or political context, and the commercial, artistic, or scientific motivations of the artist, the studio might be a haven, a stage, a laboratory, or a playground. For more than a century, photographers have dealt with the spaces of their studios in strikingly diverse and inventive ways: from using composed theatrical tableaux (in photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron or Cindy Sherman) to putting their subjects against neutral backdrops (Richard Avedon, Robert Mapplethorpe); from the construction of architectural sets within the studio (Francis Bruguière, Thomas Demand) to chemical procedures conducted within the darkroom (Walead Beshty, Christian Marclay); and from precise recordings of motion (Eadweard Muybridge, Harold Edgerton) to playful, amateurish experimentation (Roman Signer, Peter Fischli and David Weiss). A World of Its Own offers another history of photography—a photography created within the walls of the studio, and yet as innovative as its more extroverted counterpart, street photography. via MoMA

Yes you heard it right! The Massachusetts Institute of Technology is offering  Free Photography Courses through their MIT Open Courseware site.

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Thirty one full courses online right now. Here are some highlights:

MAS.531 Computational Camera and Photography | Media Arts and Sciences

21A.348 Photography and Truth | Anthropology

21W.749 Documentary Photography and Photojournalism: Still Images of a World in Motion | Writing and Humanistic Studies

11.309J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry | Urban Studies and Planning

MAS.961 Numeric Photography | Media Arts and Sciences

21W.749 Documentary Photography and Photo Journalism: Still Images of A World In Motion | Writing and Humanistic Studies

11.309J Sites in Sight: Photography as Inquiry | Urban Studies and Planning

21L.701 Literary Interpretation: Literature and Photography: The Image | Literature

21L.325 Small Wonders: Media, Modernity, and the Moment: Experiments in Time | Literature

 

MIT Free Photography Courses

With his beautiful, crazy, confusing, monumental and must see retrospective winding down at MOMA I could not help thinking about the final project Sigmar Polke spent the most time on. Forget that everyone has found it impossible to decode his enormously confusing body of work (see review links below). It turns out Polke use to be a stained glass artist and he spent the last 3 years of his life designing stained glass windows for the Grossmünster Church in Zurich using a variety of techniques including thinly sliced geodes. Much like the MOMA retrospective that Peter Schjeldahl calls, “the most dramatic (and important) museum show of the century to date”, the final stained glass works are a wonder. 

Sigmar Polke

sigmarpolke_kf_gm_03

Sigmar Polke Elijah Chariot

 All Images via http://www.grossmuenster.ch/polke.html

 

A PDF (from the church web site) explaining the entire project can be viewed here.

via Sigmar Polke – Church Windows Grossmünster Zürich from ikonoTV on Vimeo.

 

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/04/28/shock-artist

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2008/05/12/many-colored-glass-2

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/117806/sigmar-polkes-alibis-reviewed-jed-perl

http://galleristny.com/2014/03/connecting-polkes-dots-moma-decodes-the-work-of-a-tricky-postwar-master/

 

 

The Final Art Work of Sigmar Polke

Gabriele Rothemann: Bird Cages 2009

video with sound, 6 min (looped)

via http://www.gabrielerothemann.com