Ground Zero at the 9/11 Memorial Site. ©Thomas Brummett 2014 / All rights reserved

Ground Zero at the 9/11 Memorial Site. ©Thomas Brummett / All rights reserved

Great example of how the spoken word and a photograph can still make a difference in this world. By making it personal photographer Nick Bowers along with Celine Faledam and Rachel Guest interviewed and photographed a group of scientists about climate change. If the conversations don’t scare the hell out of you nothing will.  The web site, http://scaredscientists.com piece was picked up on Huffington Post as well.

Please share this with your friends.

As one scientist put it:

“One thing people need to remember, is that scientists are the biggest skeptics on Earth. We’re constantly trying to disprove each other. This is the one thing we agree on. The evidence is endless.”  

via http://scaredscientists.com/

SHAUNA MURRAY Biological Scientist University of Technology Sydney, University of Tokyo, University of New South Wales FEAR: REACHING THE FOUR DEGREES OF WARMING  We've recorded all sorts of climate change shifts in multiple areas. However, the scientific process is consistent. Every single individual study that has been done, has gone through the same rigorous process, data collection, research analysis, and qualified peer review. At the moment, we've at least 10 000 different papers, completed over 20 years, each using different data sets, and they are all coming to the same climate change conclusions. We've a weight of evidence that the average person is simply not aware of - and this frightens me.  I'd like to think that we're not going to reach the projected four degrees of warming this century; because I can't even imagine what that would look like. 80 years is not that long, and unless we act soon, my seven year old daughter will probably have to live through that.  Photo ©Nick Bowers 2014

SHAUNA MURRAY
Biological Scientist
University of Technology Sydney, University of Tokyo, University of New South Wales
FEAR: REACHING THE FOUR DEGREES OF WARMING
We’ve recorded all sorts of climate change shifts in multiple areas. However, the scientific process is consistent. Every single individual study that has been done, has gone through the same rigorous process, data collection, research analysis, and qualified peer review. At the moment, we’ve at least 10 000 different papers, completed over 20 years, each using different data sets, and they are all coming to the same climate change conclusions. We’ve a weight of evidence that the average person is simply not aware of – and this frightens me.
I’d like to think that we’re not going to reach the projected four degrees of warming this century; because I can’t even imagine what that would look like. 80 years is not that long, and unless we act soon, my seven year old daughter will probably have to live through that.
Photo ©Nick Bowers 2014

http://www.scaredscientists.com/

http://www.scaredscientists.com/

 

Scared Scientists fear Global Warming

Once upon a time in the art world if you started your career selling your work at a home furnishing chain store it might have been a career killer. In the past year Restoration Hardware has opened an Art Gallery in Manhattan showcasing a large stable of artists. One of them, Samantha Thomas, is doing work far beyond her years and really reminds me of some of the works by the late, great artist Antoni Tapies ( see image below).

antoni_tapies_ocre_i_negre_amb_tela_encolada_d5363068h

OCRE I NEGRE AMB TELA ENCOLADA (OCHRE AND BLACK WITH PASTED ON CLOTH) by ANTONI TÀPIES (B. 1923). Image via Christies

Samantha Thomas has a more intimate relationship to fabric when sculpting it into bold, undulating abstract works that deftly and powerfully intersect the worlds of painting and sculpture in a series she calls: LandscapificationIf she keeps up this type of amazing output my bet is she will not be at RH much longer… 

 

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Samantha Thomas 8

All images via RH Contemporary

 

The Art of Samantha Thomas

Just caught Brian Sanders’ Junk new work Suspended for the 2014 Philadelphia Fringe Festival. I have not had this much fun since La Fura Dels Baus at BAM years ago. It’s a great show that mixes much humor, art, eroticism, gender bending role playing, trapeze and the politics of violence. I was not bored for one minute.

Just go!!!

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Fringe Arts 2014: Brian Sanders’ Suspended

One of 3 incredible shows now up at MOMA. A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio is a text book clinic on how to hang a wide ranging thematic exhibition. On any one wall you can scan decades of work zeroing in on a particular studio practices with ideas ranging from the photographic object to the  studio as stage or laboratory. This exhibition will teach you more about photography than just about any other I can think of in the last decade.

A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio February 8–October 5, 2014 @ MOMA

Francis Bruguière. Light Abstraction. c. 1925. Gelatin silver print, 9 15/16 x 7 15/16″ (25.2 x 20.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art,  New York. Gift of Arnold Newman © 1991 Kenneth H. Bruguière and Kathleen  Bruguière Anderson

Francis Bruguière. Light Abstraction. c. 1925. Gelatin silver print, 9 15/16 x 7 15/16″ (25.2 x 20.2 cm). The Museum of Modern Art,
New York. Gift of Arnold Newman © 1991 Kenneth H. Bruguière and Kathleen
Bruguière Anderson

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A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio examines the ways in which photographers and other artists using photography have worked and experimented within their studios, from photography’s inception to the present. Featuring both new acquisitions and works from the Museum’s collection that have not been on view in recent years, A World of Its Own brings together photographs, films, and videos by artists such as Berenice Abbott, Uta Barth, Zeke Berman, Karl Blossfeldt, Constantin Brancusi, Geta Brătescu, Harry Callahan, Robert Frank, Jan Groover, Barbara Kasten, Man Ray, Bruce Nauman, Paul Outerbridge, Irving Penn, Adrian Piper, Edward Steichen, William Wegman, and Edward Weston.

Depending on the period, the cultural or political context, and the commercial, artistic, or scientific motivations of the artist, the studio might be a haven, a stage, a laboratory, or a playground. For more than a century, photographers have dealt with the spaces of their studios in strikingly diverse and inventive ways: from using composed theatrical tableaux (in photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron or Cindy Sherman) to putting their subjects against neutral backdrops (Richard Avedon, Robert Mapplethorpe); from the construction of architectural sets within the studio (Francis Bruguière, Thomas Demand) to chemical procedures conducted within the darkroom (Walead Beshty, Christian Marclay); and from precise recordings of motion (Eadweard Muybridge, Harold Edgerton) to playful, amateurish experimentation (Roman Signer, Peter Fischli and David Weiss). A World of Its Own offers another history of photography—a photography created within the walls of the studio, and yet as innovative as its more extroverted counterpart, street photography. via MoMA