Anyone in a Fine Arts program in the last 3 decades would eventually have came across the work of Barbara Kasten. Seeing her work for the first time taught me that a photograph could be so much more than just a document. Part performance, sculpture, still life and abstraction – her work blends varied traditions from multiple mediums. There are many who have explored photography this way but they all owe Kasten a nod for mining this territory so well and thoroughly.

This is the first retrospective of her work at ICA and not to be missed.

 

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Barbara Kasten: Stages is the first major survey of the work of artist Barbara Kasten. Widely recognized for her photographs, since the 1970s Kasten has developed her expansive practice through the lens of many different disciplines, including sculpture, painting, theater, textile, and installation. Spanning her nearly five-decade engagement with abstraction, light, and architectonic form, this exhibition situates Kasten’s practice within current conversations around sculpture and photography. Kasten’s interest in the interplay between three- and two-dimensional forms, her engagement with staging and the role of the prop, her cross-disciplinary process, and her new approaches to abstraction and materiality are all intensely relevant to the present artistic moment, resulting in a new generation of artists who have drawn inspiration from Kasten’s aesthetic and method.

Kasten’s work has roots in the unique and provocative intersection of Bauhaus-influenced pedagogy in the US, the California Light and Space movement, and postmodernism. Taking its cue from the multiple ways in which Kasten herself has staged her work, both in the studio and on site, the exhibition makes links between her more well-known photographic series of studio constructions and architectural interventions and her earliest fiber sculptures, mixed media works, cyanotype prints, and forays into set design. In addition, Kasten will create a new site-specific installation in the ICA galleries.

Organized by Alex Klein, the Dorothy and Stephen R. Weber (CHE’60) Program Curator. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated publication that includes a biography of the artist, new scholarly essays by the curator as well as by art historians Alex Kitnick and Jenni Sorkin, and a conversation between Kasten and artist Liz Deschenes.

 

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via ICA and barbarakasten.net

 

 

Exhibition: Barbara Kasten at ICA

Art that understands the vocabulary of its past always catches my eye. Beth Lipman who shows at the wonderful Claire Oliver Gallery in New York knows still life. Her glass sculpture speaks to that over the top still life tradition of the 17th century where bountiful excess was all the rage. (Wait!!! That seems to be our era as well!) History has a way of repeating itself but not Beth. These are really wonderful works that take take this ancient tradition and spin it so that it speaks to us here and now.

Keep an eye out for her exhibition in April 2015.

 

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All images via Claire Oliver Gallery

 

 

 

The Work of Beth Lipman

The World Court found Japan guilty of illegally harvesting whales under the pretense of “scientific study”.

Japan has refused to stop.

It’s also true for countless dolphins who are brutally murdered for their flesh by an Industry funded by the Japanese Government. On Friday, February 13th, the world will visit every Japanese Embassy in a peaceful protest. This protest is sponsored by folks at  Sea Shepherd who have been waging a navel war with the Japanese for years.   Find a protest close to you and send Japan a message the world is watching.

 

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On Friday February 13, 2015, Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, Sea Shepherd’s Cove Guardians and supporters around the world will join together for the second annual “World Love for Dolphins Day,” to hold peaceful demonstrations against Taiji, Japan’s brutal capture and slaughter of dolphins. On the eve of Valentine’s Day, thousands of people will bring the world’s love and reverence for dolphins to Japan’s doorstep at Japanese embassies and consulates across the United States and overseas.

U.S. DEMONSTRATIONS:

Demonstrations begin outside the following locations at 12:00pm ET/PT and end at 1:00pm ET/PT unless otherwise noted below. Please check the times for your demo location:

Portland
Wells Fargo Center, Suite 2700
1300 S.W. 5th Ave
Portland, OR 97201

Seattle
601 Union Street, Suite 500
Seattle WA 98101-4015

Los Angeles
350 South Grand Ave, Suite 1700
Los Angeles CA 90071-3459

Denver
1225 17th Street, Suite 3000
Denver CO 80202-5505

Houston
2 Houston Center Building
909 Fannin Street
Suite 3000
Houston TX 77010

Washington DC (12pm-2pm ET)
Meeting at DuPont Circle Metro station 12pm and marching to Embassy of Japan DuPont Circle Metro
1525 20th St. NW
Washington, DC 20008

New York
Consulate-General of Japan in New York
299 Park Ave, 19th Floor
New York NY 10171-0025

San Francisco (10:00 AM – 2:00 PM PT)
275 Battery Street, Suite 2100
San Francisco, CA 94111

Boston (12pm-2pm ET)
Federal Reserve Plaza, 22nd Floor
600 Atlantic Avenue
Boston, MA 02210

Atlanta
Phipps Tower, Suite 850
3438 Peachtree Road
Atlanta, GA 30326

Honolulu
1742 Nuuanu Avenue
Honolulu, HI 96817-3201

Indianapolis
11 South Meridian Street
Indianapolis, IN 46204

Chicago
737 North Michigan Avenue #1100
Chicago, IL 60611

Miami
80 Southwest 8th Street #3200
Miami, FL 33130

Dallas (11am-2pm CST)
Dealy Plaza
Dallas, TX

 

 

World Love for Dolphins Day

Not to late to catch this exhibition at Temple Contemporary

 

Stop Telling Women to Smile
Tatyana Fazlalizadeh

Stop Telling Women to Smile comes from Tatyana Fazlalizadeh’s interviews with women about their street harassment experiences. Fazlalizadeh draws portraits of these women, adds text from their statements and experiences, and pastes them around the city in areas where harassment occurs. They serve as a way to talk back to street harassers in the spaces where the problem exists. This is part of our series on street harassment, which grew out of our Advisory Council‘s question “What makes us feel safe?” Stop Telling Women to Smile is on view at Temple Contemporary through January 31st.

via Temple Contemporary

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The Protests of Tatyana Fazlalizadeh

Really liked these guys who opened for London Grammar in Philly this past week.

 

Music Break: Until the Ribbon Breaks